From the Coordinator This year marks the tenth anniversary of ASHA's Special Interest Divisions program in addition to the 75th anniversary of the Association. Celebrations will be taking place at the Convention. But, in addition to celebrating, we also need to consider the challenges that face us. One of the more challenging ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   October 01, 2000
From the Coordinator
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Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   October 01, 2000
From the Coordinator
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, October 2000, Vol. 8, 1-2. doi:10.1044/arii8.1.1
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, October 2000, Vol. 8, 1-2. doi:10.1044/arii8.1.1
This year marks the tenth anniversary of ASHA's Special Interest Divisions program in addition to the 75th anniversary of the Association. Celebrations will be taking place at the Convention. But, in addition to celebrating, we also need to consider the challenges that face us. One of the more challenging agenda items addressed by Division 7 this year was the document originally entitled “Minimal Competencies for Providing Audiologic Rehabilitation Services” and currently known as “Skills and Knowledge Required for the Practice of Audiologic Rehabilitation.” The Working Group on Audiologic Rehabilitation would like to thank all of the division affiliates who offered feedback on the original document. When compiled and organized, 95 pages of comments were disseminated to the Committee for further review and discussion. The fact that so many people, both audiologists and speech-language pathologists, felt strongly enough about this document to offer feedback, both positive and negative, is very exciting, especially at a time when some even question the need for such services. It reinforces the concept that aural rehabilitation is a vital, complex practice area. It is an area that blends the skills and knowledge of both professions to deal with the receptive and expressive communication differences that result from hearing loss and to help minimize the impact that these differences have on the lives of affected individuals and their families. Creating a product that reflects the individuality of each profession and yet blends the skills and knowledge of each into a comprehensive aural rehabilitation practice document is no easy task. There are skills and knowledge primarily held by speech-language pathologists and skills and knowledge primarily held by audiologists. What is unique about aural rehabilitation is the fact that it offers a single professional the opportunity to combine both areas in order to offer comprehensive services that address both the expressive and receptive needs of the client. It is important and challenging for all of us to remember this point and to continue to provide educational opportunities for professionals who choose to offer comprehensive aural rehabilitation services. We owe it to our patients, from newly identified infants to senior citizens. We owe it to the professions.
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