How to Select a Self-Assessment Instrument: What is it You Want to Know and Why? As clinicians become aware that the audiogram is an inadequate predictor of communication problems and associated adjustment difficulties their sensitivity is heightened to the importance of ascertaining clients' perceptions of their problems. As a result, use of self-report measures to assess problems associated with hearing impairment has increased. Audiological ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2001
How to Select a Self-Assessment Instrument: What is it You Want to Know and Why?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sue Ann Erdman
    Hot Springs, VA
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2001
How to Select a Self-Assessment Instrument: What is it You Want to Know and Why?
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, October 2001, Vol. 9, 7-9. doi:10.1044/arii9.1.7
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, October 2001, Vol. 9, 7-9. doi:10.1044/arii9.1.7
As clinicians become aware that the audiogram is an inadequate predictor of communication problems and associated adjustment difficulties their sensitivity is heightened to the importance of ascertaining clients' perceptions of their problems.
As a result, use of self-report measures to assess problems associated with hearing impairment has increased. Audiological literature includes numerous descriptions of these instruments and their psychometric properties and adequacy. References for self-assessment instruments can be found in AR-BIB on the ASHA Web site.
The clinical information gleaned from these instruments, however, is often under-utilized when the many applications of selfassessment instruments are not fully appreciated. Identifying a specific purpose for administering self-assessment measures and recognizing specifically what needs to be assessed will facilitate selection of an appropriate instrument. Some potential applications of self-assessment instruments include:
  • identifying and evaluating the problems that precipitate clients' decisions to seek audiological intervention,

  • facilitating the identification of individuals who may benefit from audiological intervention,

  • engaging clients in the identification and management of their problems,

  • facilitating client-clinician communication and mutual problem-solving,

  • assessing treatment benefits, client satisfaction and treatment outcomes,

  • evaluating the efficacy of specific intervention procedures and overall clinical service, and

  • ensuring professional accountability.

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