Congenital Aural Atresia: A Primer for the Hearing Professional The development of the human auditory periphery is a complicated process that begins at approximately 3 weeks gestation. All three germ cell layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) of the first two pharyngeal or branchial arches are involved in the development of the ear. Abnormalities in the peripheral auditory system ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
Congenital Aural Atresia: A Primer for the Hearing Professional
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Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2002
Congenital Aural Atresia: A Primer for the Hearing Professional
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, April 2002, Vol. 10, 12-15. doi:10.1044/arii10.1.12
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, April 2002, Vol. 10, 12-15. doi:10.1044/arii10.1.12
The development of the human auditory periphery is a complicated process that begins at approximately 3 weeks gestation. All three germ cell layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) of the first two pharyngeal or branchial arches are involved in the development of the ear. Abnormalities in the peripheral auditory system occur for numerous reasons including, but not limited to, genetic anomalies, drug toxicities, and maternal infections (Lambert, 1993). The focus of this article will be on a particular group of developmental abnormalities of the external and middle ear collectively termed congenital aural atresia (CAA). Patients with congenital aural atresia can be managed well with accurate diagnosis, appropriate amplification, and medical and/or surgical treatment. This article is not intended to be the definitive reference on atresia, but rather to provide hearing professionals with a relatively short reference on a very complicated and somewhat controversial topic. For those interested in pursuing the topic of aural atresia in greater detail, several excellent chapters and research articles in current otolaryngology textbooks and journals are referenced at the end of this paper. For readers with access to the Internet, numerous Web sites can be found by entering the term “aural atresia” into any of the commonly available search engines.
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