Welcoming and Celebrating New Voices in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology: A Critical Look at University Programs and the Treatment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Multiculturalism. Minority. Diversity. These seem to be the new buzzwords in audiology and speech-language pathology. This interest in other cultural groups can be understood in part by the demographic changes occurring in the United States. The number of U. S. racial/ethnic minorities is continuously growing. In the year 2000, ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2003
Welcoming and Celebrating New Voices in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology: A Critical Look at University Programs and the Treatment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Veronica Pimentel
    Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Indianapolis, IN
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2003
Welcoming and Celebrating New Voices in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology: A Critical Look at University Programs and the Treatment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, May 2003, Vol. 11, 3-6. doi:10.1044/arii11.1.3
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, May 2003, Vol. 11, 3-6. doi:10.1044/arii11.1.3
Multiculturalism. Minority. Diversity. These seem to be the new buzzwords in audiology and speech-language pathology. This interest in other cultural groups can be understood in part by the demographic changes occurring in the United States. The number of U. S. racial/ethnic minorities is continuously growing. In the year 2000, about 24.9% of the population in the U.S. were of non-White origin. It is estimated that by the year 2015, this percentage will increase to over 30%. It is expected that by 2010, 22% of the school-age population will be children of immigrants (U.S. Bureau of Census, 2000). A change in demographics creates the need for those in helping professions to become sensitive to possible cultural and linguistic differences. Academic programs that prepare students to become clinicians in the area of audiology and speech-language pathology should recognize, and be sensitive to, the changes in demographics occurring not only in university communities, but also throughout the U.S. These changes affect the racial/ethnic composition of the student body and of the patient/client population. University programs need to prepare students to be able to work in an increasingly multicultural environment. One of the ways to accomplish such goal is to not only attract culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students to the field, but also welcome and celebrate the students' cultural and linguistic diversity.
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