Measuring the Effects of Audiology Treatment on Health-Related Quality of Life The treatments we, as audiologists, provide to adults with hearing loss have an impact on several levels. In our work, we have found it useful to conceptualize the effects of audiology treatment through utilizing the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO-ICF, 2001). Using the ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2007
Measuring the Effects of Audiology Treatment on Health-Related Quality of Life
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Theresa H. Chisolm
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of South Florida VA Medical Center, Bay Pines, FL
  • Harvey B. Abrams
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of South Florida VA Medical Center, Bay Pines, FL
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2007
Measuring the Effects of Audiology Treatment on Health-Related Quality of Life
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, January 2007, Vol. 14, 2-6. doi:10.1044/arii14.1.2
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, January 2007, Vol. 14, 2-6. doi:10.1044/arii14.1.2
The treatments we, as audiologists, provide to adults with hearing loss have an impact on several levels. In our work, we have found it useful to conceptualize the effects of audiology treatment through utilizing the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO-ICF, 2001). Using the ICF, the effects of audiology treatment can be measured at the level of body functions and structures, activity, and participation.
The physiological and psychological tasks performed by the body systems (e.g., sensing the presence of, or discriminating the location, pitch, loudness, and quality of sounds) are classified as body functions. Body structures are the anatomic parts of the body (e.g., organs, limbs, and their components). Sensorineural (SNHL), the most common type of hearing loss in adults, is associated with disorders affecting structures of the inner ear. The most obvious consequence is a loss of hearing sensitivity or an auditory impairment. It is well-known, however, that the negative effects of adult onset hearing loss are not limited to an auditory impairment, but also involve activity limitations and participation restrictions. According to the WHO-ICF, an activity is the execution of a task or action by an individual, and an activity limitation is a change at the level of the person (e.g., inability to understand conversations). Participation refers to the involvement in life situations, and a participation restriction is the effect of these limitations on broader aspects of life (e.g., withdrawing from social situations). Consequently, reductions in participation can negatively affect an individual's health-related quality of life (HRQoL).
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