The ICF: A Classification System and Conceptual Framework Ideal for Audiological Rehabilitation In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health, commonly referred to as the ICF (WHO, 2001), which is a biopsychosocial classification system of health. It provides a common framework for describing consequences of health conditions and specifically for understanding the dimensions of ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2009
The ICF: A Classification System and Conceptual Framework Ideal for Audiological Rehabilitation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jean-Pierre Gagné
    École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal, Centre de recherché, Institut universitaire de gériatrieMontréal, Québec, Canada
  • Mary Beth Jennings
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Western Ontario, National Centre of AudiologyLondon, Ontario, Canada
  • Kenneth Southall
    Montréal (Québec)Canada
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / International & Global / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2009
The ICF: A Classification System and Conceptual Framework Ideal for Audiological Rehabilitation
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, October 2009, Vol. 16, 8-14. doi:10.1044/arii16.1.8
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, October 2009, Vol. 16, 8-14. doi:10.1044/arii16.1.8
Abstract

In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health, commonly referred to as the ICF (WHO, 2001), which is a biopsychosocial classification system of health. It provides a common framework for describing consequences of health conditions and specifically for understanding the dimensions of health and functioning. The ICF is particularly relevant for rehabilitation sciences because the health conditions of people seeking rehabilitation services are typically chronic and the associated impairments cannot be cured. The present article highlights some key differences between a curative and a rehabilitative approach to health services. Then, the components of the IFC are defined, described, and illustrated. The main characteristics of the classification system are outlined. Finally, some important features associated with the use of the ICF as a conceptual framework for clinical services in rehabilitative audiology are presented.

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