Professional Preparedness for Provision of Auditory Oral Programs to Children With Hearing Loss: Results of a Survey Advances in technology have facilitated development of auditory-oral skills in greater numbers of children who are deaf. In addition, mainstream educational placements are increasing for this population. Since success in the mainstream is largely dependent upon development of oral communication skills, it is imperative that professionals working with these children ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2008
Professional Preparedness for Provision of Auditory Oral Programs to Children With Hearing Loss: Results of a Survey
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joan A. Luckhurst
    Speech-Language-Hearing Science Program, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2008
Professional Preparedness for Provision of Auditory Oral Programs to Children With Hearing Loss: Results of a Survey
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, April 2008, Vol. 15, 18-28. doi:10.1044/arii15.1.18
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, April 2008, Vol. 15, 18-28. doi:10.1044/arii15.1.18
Abstract

Advances in technology have facilitated development of auditory-oral skills in greater numbers of children who are deaf. In addition, mainstream educational placements are increasing for this population. Since success in the mainstream is largely dependent upon development of oral communication skills, it is imperative that professionals working with these children have competence in auditory-oral methodology. The present study investigated professionals' perceptions of preparedness to develop and implement auditory-oral programs. Professionals using an auditory-oral approach were asked about their perceived levels of knowledge and skills, pre-service training, and on-the-job factors that contributed to their competence to provide auditory-oral programs to children who are deaf. Classification tables, chi-square, and qualitative analyses were used to determine professionals' perceptions of preparedness and to identify significant differences among professional groups (i.e., speech-language pathologists, teachers of the deaf, audiologists), as well as specific aspects of pre-service and occupational training that promoted knowledge and skills. Results indicated that a significant number of professionals in all groups feel unprepared. Specific group differences and needed components for adequate preparation are discussed. Suggestions for further study are presented.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.