Towards a Social Psychology of Living With Acquired Hearing Loss Stigmatized social identity can create psychological barriers to the effective delivery of hearing services for people with acquired hearing loss. These barriers can lead to denial and inhibit clients from accepting the help they need, even if this denial poses disadvantages to their well-being. To overcome these barriers, services are ... Article
Article  |   October 2011
Towards a Social Psychology of Living With Acquired Hearing Loss
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anthony Hogan
    School of Sociology, The Australian National University
  • Katherine J. Reynolds
    Department of Psychology, The Australian National University
  • Léan O’Brien
    National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National UniversityCanberra, Australia
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   October 2011
Towards a Social Psychology of Living With Acquired Hearing Loss
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, October 2011, Vol. 18, 13-22. doi:10.1044/arii18.1.13
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, October 2011, Vol. 18, 13-22. doi:10.1044/arii18.1.13

Stigmatized social identity can create psychological barriers to the effective delivery of hearing services for people with acquired hearing loss. These barriers can lead to denial and inhibit clients from accepting the help they need, even if this denial poses disadvantages to their well-being. To overcome these barriers, services are needed that address identity-related issues along with strategies that specifically address stigma. Acquired hearing loss can disrupt existing interpersonal social relations and threaten social identity and status. Efforts to change group norms within a client’s immediate social network can provide the social support and practical solutions needed to minimize distress and help create a pool of people who are capable of mobilizing in the interests of broader destigmatization and social change. From the perspective of social psychology and social identity theory, the outreach strategy in the audiologic rehabilitation program originally described by Raymond Hétu and colleague Louise Getty (Getty & Hétu, 1991; Hétu & Getty, 1991), referred to herein as the Montreal Model, offers clinicians an effective psychosocial strategy for engaging clients and significant others in a useful change process.

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