Utility of the Baddeley and Hitch Model of Short-Term Working Memory To Investigate Spoken Language Understanding: A Tutorial. Spoken speech understanding can be challenging, particularly in the presence of competing information such as background noise. Researchers have shown that dynamic observable phonetic facial cues improve speech understanding in both quiet and noise. Additionally, cognitive functions such as short-term working memory influence spoken language understanding. Currently, we do not ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2012
Utility of the Baddeley and Hitch Model of Short-Term Working Memory To Investigate Spoken Language Understanding: A Tutorial.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn M. Bielski
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL
  • Charissa R. Lansing
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL
  • Author Note
    Author Note×
    This work was supported in part by a grant from the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education, number H325D070061.
    This work was supported in part by a grant from the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education, number H325D070061.×
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2012
Utility of the Baddeley and Hitch Model of Short-Term Working Memory To Investigate Spoken Language Understanding: A Tutorial.
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, May 2012, Vol. 19, 25-33. doi:10.1044/arii19.1.25
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, May 2012, Vol. 19, 25-33. doi:10.1044/arii19.1.25

Spoken speech understanding can be challenging, particularly in the presence of competing information such as background noise. Researchers have shown that dynamic observable phonetic facial cues improve speech understanding in both quiet and noise. Additionally, cognitive functions such as short-term working memory influence spoken language understanding. Currently, we do not know the utility of visual cues for the improvement of spoken language understanding. Although there are many theoretical models of short-term memory, the Baddeley and Hitch (1974)  multicomponent model of short-term working memory is well-suited as a cognitive framework through which the utility of visual cues in spoken language understanding could be investigated. In this tutorial, we will describe the components of the Baddeley and Hitch model, illustrate their contributions to spoken language understanding, and provide possible applications for the model.

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