Building a Cochlear Implant Practice: Five Lessons Learned Cochlear implants are becoming available to an increasing proportion of the deaf and hard-of-hearing population. As interest in and success with cochlear implants has grown, more and more private practice clinics are incorporating them into their scopes of practice. Over the past 2 years, the first 2 authors of this ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2013
Building a Cochlear Implant Practice: Five Lessons Learned
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne M. Lobdell
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, ENT Specialists, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Joseph E. Dansie
    Peak ENT
  • Sarah Hargus Ferguson
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Disclosure: Anne M. Lobdell has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Anne M. Lobdell has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Joseph E. Dansie has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Joseph E. Dansie has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Sarah Hargus Ferguson has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Sarah Hargus Ferguson has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2013
Building a Cochlear Implant Practice: Five Lessons Learned
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, January 2013, Vol. 20, 14-21. doi:10.1044/arii20.1.14
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, January 2013, Vol. 20, 14-21. doi:10.1044/arii20.1.14

Cochlear implants are becoming available to an increasing proportion of the deaf and hard-of-hearing population. As interest in and success with cochlear implants has grown, more and more private practice clinics are incorporating them into their scopes of practice. Over the past 2 years, the first 2 authors of this article have been heavily involved in developing cochlear implant programs in separate otolaryngology private practices. A recent conversation about this process revealed several common experiences and lessons learned. During these same 2 years, the third author began teaching the cochlear implant course at the University of Utah. Although her audiology and speech science background gave her extensive knowledge of the science behind cochlear implants, she had no clinical experience with them. The first author took this course the first time the third author taught it, and the experiences and insights she shared with the third author during and since the course have been an important component of the third author’s personal education in the clinical aspects of cochlear implants. In this article, the first 2 authors share 5 things we wish we had known when first beginning their work with cochlear implants.

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