Considerations in Mapping Young Children With Simultaneous/Sequential Bilateral CIs: Case Studies In this article, we present three case studies of young children with profound sensorineural hearing loss who received bilateral cochlear implants. In each of these cases, specialists suspected interference between the ears. The audiologist and speech-language pathologist determined that the children had better auditory function and speech and language production ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2013
Considerations in Mapping Young Children With Simultaneous/Sequential Bilateral CIs: Case Studies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristin Vasil-Dilaj
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
    New England Center for Hearing Rehabilitation, Hampton, CT
  • Diane Brackett
    New England Center for Hearing Rehabilitation, Hampton, CT
  • Disclosure: Kristin Vasil-Dilaj has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Kristin Vasil-Dilaj has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Diane Brackett has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Diane Brackett has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2013
Considerations in Mapping Young Children With Simultaneous/Sequential Bilateral CIs: Case Studies
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, January 2013, Vol. 20, 4-13. doi:10.1044/arii20.1.4
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, January 2013, Vol. 20, 4-13. doi:10.1044/arii20.1.4

In this article, we present three case studies of young children with profound sensorineural hearing loss who received bilateral cochlear implants. In each of these cases, specialists suspected interference between the ears. The audiologist and speech-language pathologist determined that the children had better auditory function and speech and language production when wearing 1 speech processor as opposed to 2 speech processors. In many pediatric implantation cases, experts verify the device fitting in the bilateral condition because infants and toddlers at the prelanguage level are unable to provide specific input during mapping sessions. The cases we describe herein highlight the need for individual ear verification at early stages of speech and language development. In addition, based on these cases, we propose mapping changes that can be made to optimize binaural listening for speech and language development.

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