Using a Family-Centered Care Approach in Audiologic Rehabilitation for Adults with Hearing Impairment Hearing problems are the most common communication disability in older people. The wide-ranging impact of hearing impairment means that not only does the person with hearing impairment experience the consequences, but also his or her family members. This impact on family members is referred to as a “third-party disability” (World ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2013
Using a Family-Centered Care Approach in Audiologic Rehabilitation for Adults with Hearing Impairment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nerina Scarinci
    Communication Disability Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia
  • Carly Meyer
    Communication Disability Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia
  • Katie Ekberg
    Communication Disability Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia
  • Louise Hickson
    Communication Disability Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia
  • Disclosure: Financial: Nerina Scarinci, Cary Meyer, Katie Ekberg, and Louise Hickson work in the Communication Disability Centre at the School of Health and Rehabilitations Sciences at the University of Queensland.
    Disclosure: Financial: Nerina Scarinci, Cary Meyer, Katie Ekberg, and Louise Hickson work in the Communication Disability Centre at the School of Health and Rehabilitations Sciences at the University of Queensland.×
  • Nonfinancial: Nerina Scarinci and Louise Hickson have previously published in this topic area, some of which are cited in this text. Carly Meyer has previously published in this topic area. Katie Ekberg has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Nerina Scarinci and Louise Hickson have previously published in this topic area, some of which are cited in this text. Carly Meyer has previously published in this topic area. Katie Ekberg has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2013
Using a Family-Centered Care Approach in Audiologic Rehabilitation for Adults with Hearing Impairment
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, December 2013, Vol. 20, 83-90. doi:10.1044/arri20.3.83
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, December 2013, Vol. 20, 83-90. doi:10.1044/arri20.3.83

Hearing problems are the most common communication disability in older people. The wide-ranging impact of hearing impairment means that not only does the person with hearing impairment experience the consequences, but also his or her family members. This impact on family members is referred to as a “third-party disability” (World Health Organization, 2001). Health professionals and researchers worldwide suggest that professionals can increase effectiveness of health care if they take into account the needs of the person with hearing impairment and the needs of family members (Dunst, 2002). This article discusses the important role of family-centered care in audiologic rehabilitation for adults with hearing impairment. Strategies for increased inclusion of family members in the rehabilitation process are proposed, with concepts from the field of psychology applied to audiologic rehabilitation.

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