The Role of Shared Decision-Making in Audiologic Rehabilitation Shared decision-making (SDM), a component of patient-centered care, is the process in which the clinician and patient both participate in decision-making about treatment; information is shared between the parties and both agree with the decision. Shared decision-making is appropriate for health care conditions in which there is more than one ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2014
The Role of Shared Decision-Making in Audiologic Rehabilitation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Helen Pryce
    Centre for Hearing and Balance Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, England
  • Amanda Hall
    Centre for Hearing and Balance Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, England
  • Disclosure: Financial: Helen Pryce and Amanda Hall have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Helen Pryce and Amanda Hall have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Helen Pryce and Amanda Hall have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Helen Pryce and Amanda Hall have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2014
The Role of Shared Decision-Making in Audiologic Rehabilitation
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, May 2014, Vol. 21, 15-23. doi:10.1044/arri21.1.15
SIG 7 Perspectives on Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, May 2014, Vol. 21, 15-23. doi:10.1044/arri21.1.15

Shared decision-making (SDM), a component of patient-centered care, is the process in which the clinician and patient both participate in decision-making about treatment; information is shared between the parties and both agree with the decision. Shared decision-making is appropriate for health care conditions in which there is more than one evidence-based treatment or management option that have different benefits and risks. The patient's involvement ensures that the decisions regarding treatment are sensitive to the patient's values and preferences. Audiologic rehabilitation requires substantial behavior changes on the part of patients and includes benefits to their communication as well as compromises and potential risks. This article identifies the importance of shared decision-making in audiologic rehabilitation and the changes required to implement it effectively.

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